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The “35 Female Visionaries You Need To Know” List from The Rise to the Top

If having a powerful vision makes one a “visionary” then I qualify. David Siteman Garland, founder, host and visionary behind The Rise to the Top, thought I qualified when he listed me as one of his “35 Female Visionaries You Need to Know.” I was delighted to find myself in the company of other St. Louis visionaries (and luminaries) like Maxine Clark of Build-A-Bear, Dani Apted Schlottman of the St. Louis Aces and Ria Sharon and Suzanne Tucker of My Mommy Manual. My good friend and cohort, Dafna Michaelson of The Journey Institute, was also on the list along with nationally recognized success mavens like Pamela Slim, Ali Brown, Alexis Martin Neely and Patti Stang. So nice to have my “vision” recognized and to be placed in the company of so many women I respect!      ...

What Does YOUR Practice Make Possible?

I had an amazing workout with my fitness coach this morning.  Actually, Kimberly is more of a “transformation coach” than a fitness coach. (That’s her on the left, of course.) She has a very interactive mind/body/spirit approach so our time together is a fabulous combination of hard physical activity (she’s teaching me to HIT things so watch out!) honing my form to shape the “little muscles,” and working on my nutrition plan and my mindset. One of the things that I love about working with Kimberly is that I am NEVER bored with my workout. I have a typical entrepreneurial mind - always in high gear. If it isn’t engaged with what I’m physically doing, my body just has to go on without it because it is racing away thinking about all the other things I’m going to do, want to do, dreaming of doing, and so on. That can lead to boredom, impatience, aborted workouts, and, if I continue with my workout after my mind has moved on to something more interesting it can spoil my form and keep me from getting the most out of my efforts. (It can even lead to injury if my form slips that much.) So Kimberly, who tells me I’m in good company and a LOT of her clients are like that, keeps every exercise a little more mentally challenging by designing combinations of movements that make me have to think about what I’m doing. We don’t do squats then rows – we do them in combination. That means I have to think about holding the squat position, pay attention to keeping my...